71-year-old man survives after removing cancer the size of a watermelon and weighing 10 kg

At the beginning of 2021, retired Derek Cornelius, 71, was surprised by the rapid weight gain and, consequently, the growth of his belly. When he went to get vaccinated against the flu, he decided to ask the doctor if what was happening to him was common.

It wasn’t normal! And he was referred for a series of tests, including a CT scan. In it, it was found that the Briton, who lives in Dorset, a state in the south of England, had stomach cancer that weighed about 10 kilos and was the size of a watermelon.

The tumor already occupied 90% of his stomach and the doctors said nothing could be done due to the size of the cancer. Cornelius would have little time to live, as growth would continue and the retiree’s other organs could be crushed.

“When a woman has a baby, they usually weigh three pounds. I was carrying the equivalent of triplets. I was told it was terminal and nothing could be done,” the retired social worker told the British newspaper DailyMail.

Dissatisfied, the elderly man sought a second opinion, this time in London, the English capital. Doctors said they would try to have the removal surgery, but there was a possibility that he would die during the procedure.

“Suddenly, there was hope. When I went to London and met with the doctor and he asked me what I would like done with the tumor. I said I could cut it or blow it up with dynamite, as long as he pulled it out. me”, explained Cornellius to the British publication.

In December of last year, doctors managed to remove the entire tumor within three hours of surgery and Cornelius survived. The only sequels were the scar from the 70 stitches he received from his groin to his chest, the loss of one of his kidneys and a permanent numbness in his right thigh.

He ensures that this numbness does not interfere with your daily life. He walks, runs and dances with Pam, his wife of 44 years.

“I currently look at my life differently because I feel like I had a near-death experience. I count my blessings every morning and think about how lucky I am. I hope that when people read my story, they always look for a second opinion, because this can save more lives,” said Cornelius.

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