Persuasion: The Differences Between the Netflix Book and Movie

The Netflix adaptation of the novel Persuasion, by Jane Austen, is making many fans apprehensive. After all, there would be many differences between the original work and the film released in the service of streaming. The history of Persuasionincidentally, revolves around Anne Elliot (played in the Dakota Johnson film), a woman who is persuaded to give up on the man she loves.

If you want to join this chorus of disgruntled fans and list the many differences between the two products, here is a series of arguments for you to use in discussions with friends.

1. The use of the first person feature

(Source: Netflix)(Source: Netflix)

Many people were surprised by the tone of the film, told in first person, from Anne’s angle and with the constant breaking of the fourth wall (when a character looks directly at the audience). The book Persuasion it is quite introspective and without so many dialogues, which brought some difficulties in adapting. The resource used by director Carrie Cracknell was to put the narrative in the voice of the central character, helping to tell the story in less than two hours.

2. Anne Elliot is very introverted in the original work

(Source: Netflix)(Source: Netflix)

The character Anne Elliot is recognized as the most introverted of Jane Austen’s heroines – so she’s not always a fan favorite. But this self-absorption of the protagonist is changed a little with Dakota Johnson’s Anne, who challenges the audience and makes some cheeky comments during the film’s plot — she even appears drunk and flirting with Mr. Elliot. It is, therefore, a much more “out there” version of the original Annie.

3. The book has a more serious tone

(Source: Netflix)(Source: Netflix)

The film Persuasion it has a lot more humor than the original novel — see scenes where Anne spreads jelly on her face. Therefore, the work of Netflix is ​​closer to a romantic comedy, which is very different from the serious tone used by Jane Austen.

4. Anne participates much more in the family finances in the book

(Source: Netflix)(Source: Netflix)

The bad financial decisions of Sir Walter, Anne’s father, are shown quite dramatically in the Netflix film, with scenes of debt collectors collecting things from the house and scandalizing the family. In the original book, the character is more direct on the subject and asks his eldest daughter Elizabeth for advice on where to cut costs.

Anne ends up playing a very strong role in the refinancing of the property and the family’s financial cuts, but this does not appear in the film.

5. Anne never thought of marrying Mr. Elliot

(Source: Netflix)(Source: Netflix)

In the film, there is a strong bond between Anne and Mr. Elliot, who doesn’t rule out marrying him — they even appear frequently flirting. Already in the book, Anne always makes it clear that she never intends to marry him, nor does she waver about it: her true love has always been Captain Wentworth.

6. The relationship between Charles and Mary is much more strained in the book

(Source: Netflix)(Source: Netflix)

When Anne rejects Charles’ marriage proposal, his younger sister Mary ends up marrying him. In the film, they are shown to be a happy couple, although Charles is a bit annoyed by his wife’s tendency to seem like she is always sick.

In the book, however, they have a lot more edges. They disagree a lot about raising their children and both complain about each other to Anne.

7. Elizabeth appears a lot more in the book

(Source: Netflix)(Source: Netflix)

The character Elizabeth has a much larger role in the book as she is the oldest woman in the family and is involved with the administration of Kellynch Hall. The jealousy that she feels of Mary is also very much worked in the work of Jane Austen. In the film, she appears in very few scenes.

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