Opinion: Dear Brooklyn Peltz Beckham: Did you know that being a nepotism baby doesn’t mean you have to be unbearable?



Speaking of nepo babies (or nepotism babies), because everyone is one these days, meet Brooklyn Peltz Beckham. Now, in case you’re not familiar with the term, nepo babies are the children of people who are rich, famous or of great influence; and Peltz Beckham, son of sports star David and Spice Girl Victoria, is a prime example. The young Brooklyn has been trying to find his professional calling for several years, always in the public eye. At age 16, he had a brief stint as a professional football player (the fact that his father was none other than David Beckham was purely coincidental). A brief stint as a model followed. Then came the fleeting days when Brooklyn studied photography at New York’s Parsons School of Design. He published (of course) a “curated” book of his favorite photos, produced by a major publisher in 2017, titled What I see. One of the photographs included was the blurred silhouette of an elephant alongside the words: “Elephants in Kenya: so difficult to photograph but amazing to see”.

But these were mere hobbies, proof of what Brooklyn’s true and real vocation is: cooking. Like any budding chef, Beckham’s eldest son has a popular series on social media. “Cookin’ with Brooklyn” has a team of 62 people to help B make sandwiches and the like. Even though the show has been criticized, perhaps because Brooklyn seems like a terrible cook, her confidence remains unshakable.

This week, producer Daniel Mac saw the young man driving his $1.2 million MacLaren P1 down Los Angeles’ main street, Rodeo Drive. The host of “What do you do for a living?” [¿A qué te dedicas?] TikTok asked Brooklyn this same question, clearly suggesting that Brooklyn’s ship was amazing and that he wanted to know how he made the money to pay for it. Peltz Beckham’s proud answer was, “I’m a chef.” Some people in the comments pointed out that he didn’t seem to get the point.

In addition to Brooklyn’s talents in the kitchen, he and his wife (actress and heiress Nicola Peltz) are apparently responsible for an entirely new phenomenon: the combination of surnames (surnames with a hyphen). While most would argue that this is unoriginal, Brooklyn is convinced that “Peltz Beckham” is the product of his infinitely creative mind. Combined surnames: so hard to find but amazing to see.

Eager to get my rags out in the sun, I’ll share that my son, who doesn’t have an agreed-upon name, is also a chef at a restaurant outside of Philadelphia. Patrick drives an “old” Kia that’s worth maybe $12,000, and by the standard of an average cook’s car, he’s up there. It so happens that one does not enter this field for riches and glory. Chefs sacrifice countless hours in stifling restaurant kitchens, using their burns and knife cuts as badges of honor. It’s hard to imagine Brooklyn actually taking any of the steps necessary to climb the culinary ladder; it’s likely that the next time we turn the page on the calendar we’ll see him trying another profession.

Other examples of kids getting a “little” push from their famous parents include Dakota Johnson, Zoë Kravitz, Maud Apatow and Jaden Smith. It’s honest and refreshing when some of them confess their lives of privilege and influence. Filmmaker Destry Spielberg (daughter of Steven Spielberg and Kate Capshaw) herself says: “I admit that I was born with privilege! I am fully aware of this! My mission is to bring new talent into the industry and provide opportunities for artists of all backgrounds. Nobody should be left out because of the connections they don’t have.” Destry is using his platform to spotlight those who don’t come from a family with a superstar director.

Gen Z largely views nepo babies philosophically. Young people today seem to have accepted that, rightly or wrongly, some are born with great advantages in the world. Actress Jess Elgene, quoted in The New York Times newspaper, has a message for the privileged: “Just say, ‘Yes, I’m the son of a celebrity and I’m so grateful for the opportunities you’ve obviously given me.’ Then there is no problem. I think what bothers me is when there is a denial of this situational difference: the simple look of hard work.”

So Brooklyn, I wish you the best in all your future endeavors. And I’m sure you put a lot of effort into what you do. But please stop pretending that you’re a typical young adult, or that having famous parents doesn’t help. Acting like a random person insults the vast majority of young chefs, photographers and football players who have a hard time achieving their goals. Recognize your extreme good fortune, work hard and humbly, and give back to the world. Then you will be really successful.



Speaking of nepo babies (or nepotism babies), because everyone is one these days, meet Brooklyn Peltz Beckham. Now, in case you’re not familiar with the term, nepo babies are the children of people who are rich, famous or of great influence; and Peltz Beckham, son of sports star David and Spice Girl Victoria, is a prime example. The young Brooklyn has been trying to find his professional calling for several years, always in the public eye. At age 16, he had a brief stint as a professional football player (the fact that his father was none other than David Beckham was purely coincidental). A brief stint as a model followed. Then came the fleeting days when Brooklyn studied photography at New York’s Parsons School of Design. He published (of course) a “curated” book of his favorite photos, produced by a major publisher in 2017, titled What I see. One of the photographs included was the blurred silhouette of an elephant alongside the words: “Elephants in Kenya: so difficult to photograph but amazing to see”.

But these were mere hobbies, proof of what Brooklyn’s true and real vocation is: cooking. Like any budding chef, Beckham’s eldest son has a popular series on social media. “Cookin’ with Brooklyn” has a team of 62 people to help B make sandwiches and the like. Even though the show has been criticized, perhaps because Brooklyn seems like a terrible cook, her confidence remains unshakable.

This week, producer Daniel Mac saw the young man driving his $1.2 million MacLaren P1 down Los Angeles’ main street, Rodeo Drive. The host of “What do you do for a living?” [¿A qué te dedicas?] TikTok asked Brooklyn this same question, clearly suggesting that Brooklyn’s ship was amazing and that he wanted to know how he made the money to pay for it. Peltz Beckham’s proud answer was, “I’m a chef.” Some people in the comments pointed out that he didn’t seem to get the point.

In addition to Brooklyn’s talents in the kitchen, he and his wife (actress and heiress Nicola Peltz) are apparently responsible for an entirely new phenomenon: the combination of surnames (surnames with a hyphen). While most would argue that this is unoriginal, Brooklyn is convinced that “Peltz Beckham” is the product of his infinitely creative mind. Combined surnames: so hard to find but amazing to see.

Eager to get my rags out in the sun, I’ll share that my son, who doesn’t have an agreed-upon name, is also a chef at a restaurant outside of Philadelphia. Patrick drives an “old” Kia that’s worth maybe $12,000, and by the standard of an average cook’s car, he’s up there. It so happens that one does not enter this field for riches and glory. Chefs sacrifice countless hours in stifling restaurant kitchens, using their burns and knife cuts as badges of honor. It’s hard to imagine Brooklyn actually taking any of the steps necessary to climb the culinary ladder; it’s likely that the next time we turn the page on the calendar we’ll see him trying another profession.

Other examples of kids getting a “little” push from their famous parents include Dakota Johnson, Zoë Kravitz, Maud Apatow and Jaden Smith. It’s honest and refreshing when some of them confess their lives of privilege and influence. Filmmaker Destry Spielberg (daughter of Steven Spielberg and Kate Capshaw) herself says: “I admit that I was born with privilege! I am fully aware of this! My mission is to bring new talent into the industry and provide opportunities for artists of all backgrounds. Nobody should be left out because of the connections they don’t have.” Destry is using his platform to spotlight those who don’t come from a family with a superstar director.

Gen Z largely views nepo babies philosophically. Young people today seem to have accepted that, rightly or wrongly, some are born with great advantages in the world. Actress Jess Elgene, quoted in The New York Times newspaper, has a message for the privileged: “Just say, ‘Yes, I’m the son of a celebrity and I’m so grateful for the opportunities you’ve obviously given me.’ Then there is no problem. I think what bothers me is when there is a denial of this situational difference: the simple look of hard work.”

So Brooklyn, I wish you the best in all your future endeavors. And I’m sure you put a lot of effort into what you do. But please stop pretending that you’re a typical young adult, or that having famous parents doesn’t help. Acting like a random person insults the vast majority of young chefs, photographers and football players who have a hard time achieving their goals. Recognize your extreme good fortune, work hard and humbly, and give back to the world. Then you will be really successful.

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